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April 1, 2020 Malcolm Struthers0

During this time of social distancing and self-isolation, it is vital to keep safe and important to stay positive, active and entertained. Happy Valley Pride has produced some useful links and resources to help. 

We will keep adding to the list over the coming weeks and encourage you to provide your suggestions and recommendations on our Facebook page.

The resources are listed are free to access – simply click the links below for more information.

Stay Positive!

Healthy Minds Calderdale – Calderdale’s local mental health charity is led by people who have personal experience of emotional distress. They have a number of services available during this time.

LGBT Foundation – Delivering advice, support and information services to lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) communities. They have a dedicated page for specific advice related to services available during the current crisis.

Stonewall – The website includes information on how LGTBTQ+ organisations are coming together during the current crisis. They also have a Stonewall home learning pack for teachers and parents.

Stay Active!

Dolly Trolley – Join in with Drag Aerobics on Facebook and Instagram every Wednesday, 7.30 to 8.30pm.

To The Max Fitness – Free online sessions are available from Happy Valley Pride supporter Max.

Cooking with Antoni from Queer Eye – As well as exercise, it is important to keep nourished and Antoni provides quick and easy recipes on his Instagram.

Stay Entertained!

Podcasts

There are a huge range of podcast available – check out the best LGBTQ+ Podcasts according to Attitude. Here are some of our additional favourites.

Queer Margins – A podcast hearing from the voices on the margins of the LBGTQ+ community.

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness – Jonathan from Queer Eye gets curious about a range of different things! Go with him on his journey to find out more.

OUT with Suzi Ruffell – The fantastic lesbian comedian Suzi Ruffell, who played Happy Valley Pride last year, launches a new podcast on the 6 April. She looks at the lives of LGBTQ+ people, coming out and finding your place in the world – for anyone has ever felt like an outsider.

Film Recommendations 

BFI Flare at home – you can experience selections from BFI Flare: London LGBTIQ+ Film Festival’s 2020 programme from the comfort of your couch with a free 14-day trial.

Rafiki – All 4 – A moving drama exploring attitudes and laws around LGBTQ+ rights in Kenya. The daughters of two opposing politicians fall in love in this award-winning film. In English and Swahili/subs.

TV Recommendations 

Feel Good – All 4 – New LGBTQ+ comedy drama created by and starring Mae Martin.

Sugar Rush – All 4 – Classic drama series based on the novel by Julie Burchill. Teenager Kim moves to Brighton and develops an earth-shattering, hormone-surging crush on her new best friend, Sugar.

Queer As Folk – All 4 – Ground breaking drama from the nineties that chronicles the lives of three gay men living in Manchester’s gay village around Canal Street. 

Years and Years – BBC iPlayer – From Russell T Davies, an ordinary family contend with an uncertain future in that begins in 2019 and propels the characters 15 years forward into an unstable world.

Music

Club Quarantine – A daily online queer party – more details on their Instagram account.

Jinkx Monsoon Playlist – Friend of Happy Valley Pride and RuPaul’s Drag Race winner, Jinkx Monsoon present their quarantine playlist (spotify:playlist:6RlQ9BoPrvLp0uFWfXnHZ)

Art

Face of Frida – A look at the life and work of artist Frida Kahlo.

Keith Haring and Michael Basquiat: Crossing lines, a virtual art tour – National Gallery of Victoria present Queer artists Keith Haring and Michael Basquiat

Go out without going out!

It is easy to go out without leaving your living room. You could watch the Bolshoi Ballet, or maybe a West End Musical is more your thing. You could take a tour of Tate Britain or keep an eye on the animals at Edinburgh Zoo. Maybe take a trip to Machu Picchu or browse The Lourve. We live in a time when the world is at our fingertips.

More on subscription services

There are a number of subscription services providing a huge amount of content. These include:

Amazon Prime includes Making the Cut, Booksmart and more.

Sky/Now TV includes Hitmen, Modern Family, Looking and more.

Netflix includes – AJ & The Queen, all of Studio Ghibli, God’s Own Country, Paris is Burning, Pose and more.



March 18, 2020 Malcolm Struthers0

In line with new measures introduced recently regarding the Covid-19 virus, we will be rescheduling all programmed activities including the ‘Big Night Out’ series of events.  

Our focus at the moment is the safety of all our supporters and volunteers.

Please stay safe and take care of one another during these difficult times.

Thank you from all at Happy Valley Pride.


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February 19, 2020 Malcolm Struthers

UPDATE – THESE EVENTS HAVE BEEN CANCELLED OR POSTPONED

Happy Valley Pride announces a ‘Big Night Out’ series of community events. 

These special one-off activities will take place all year round to complement the main festival at the end of July. They will be focussed on bringing the community together for a special night of entertainment. 

The first three ‘Big Night Out’ events have been announced. 

Writing Anne Lister: An LGBTQ+ History 

Hebden Bridge Town Hall on Wednesday 18 March at 7pm. Tickets £3 here or on the door. 

Writer and academic Dr Jill Liddington, whose research into the diaries of Anne Lister inspired the BBC/HBO series Gentleman Jack, will provide an insight into the life and times this pioneer. The 19th-century businesswoman, mountaineer, world traveller, and science enthusiast is often called “the first modern lesbian”. Her edition, Female Fortune: land, gender & authority: the Anne Lister Diaries 1833-36 (1998, 2019), inspired scriptwriter Sally Wainwright to write Gentleman Jack.

And Then We Danced

in partnership with Hebden Bridge Film Festival 

Hebden Bridge Picture House on Sunday 29 February at 5.30pm. Tickets available here.

A special screening of the award-wining LGBT+ film. This passionate and beautiful coming-of-age tale about forbidden love in the Georgian ballet caused violent protests during screenings in Georgia. It will bring the 2020 Hebden Bridge Film Festival to a close.

Kirsty’s Poptastic Piano Singalong: Gay Anthems Special!

Drink, Market Street, Hebden Bridge on Friday 17 April at 8pm. Free entry

Join Kirsty for a special singalong and lots of laughs where the audience pick the songs. Kirsty is a veteran performer on the musical comedy scene, having toured with award-winning comedians Paul Merton, Rich Hall, and dozens more

Tim Whitehead, Happy Valley Pride Chair said:

“We are thrilled to announce a new series of nights out, bringing the same high-quality events that Happy Valley Pride festival has become renowned for to the rest of the year. An eclectic mix of performance, club nights, talks and film screenings, each ‘Big Night Out’ will bring the community together for a very special night of entertainment.”


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May 17, 2019 Nicola Jones0

I wanted to share my thoughts on why May 17 – International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia #IDAHOBIT matters in 2019.

I’ve put a short video together, sharing my experiences as a straight ally and on supporting the LGBT+ community since the mid-80’s. Standing up and calling out those who cannot understand that #loveislove is key to stamping out prejudice.


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March 15, 2019 Nicola Jones0
We are now recruiting for Volunteer Trustees to sit on the board and take part in planning and running the festival.
Applications from all would be very happily received, though we would particularly welcome applications from those who identify as trans, lesbian and members of the BAME community, to ensure our board is as widely representative as possible. Candidates with some daytime availability would be particularly welcome.
We are particularly seeking people with strong skills relating to
  • – project and/or event management experience;
  • – fundraising bid writing;
    – creative and artistic flair;
     – arts management;
    –  education/working with young people
    –  technical IT experience;
     – book keeping and finance skills.
    Please apply by 4pm, Wednesday 17 April 2019.
    We are aiming to appoint by end of April.

    APPLY NOW


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    February 11, 2019 0

    Never before have trans and non-binary people been in the spotlight so intently. A day almost never goes by without a news story.

    The media in the last few years has shown both documentaries and drama featuring trans people. ‘Leo: Becoming a Trans Man (BBC, 2017), showed the personal journey of a young man in a way that was relatable and showed the everyday struggles of realising one’s true gender. ITV’s ‘Butterfly’ was described as a ‘game changer’ by campaigners, as the often-debated topic of childhood transition was broached in a three-part drama. Complex issues of childbirth and gender identity were explored in the BBC’s ‘The Pregnant Dad’ (2018). This is just a small sample of the myriad programmes, radio broadcasts and newspaper and magazine articles focusing on the trans and non-binary community.

    Is all this media exposure and public debate a good thing? It certainly feels that trans visibility is now ‘coming of age’ after many decades. The late Julia Grant’s transition followed on the BBC2 documentary ‘A Change of Sex’ (1979) was one of the first programmes to attempt to explain gender change to a UK audience, when 9 million people tuned in. The public is now aware of trans and non-binary people in a way unparalleled in my lifetime.

    So why, as a gay man and trans ally does this searing media exposure and discussion of private identity seems so familiar? Back in the 1980s, with the AIDS crisis in full, horrific effect, gay men and lesbians were the number one scapegoat for all society’s ills. Bisexuals were ignored, a problem both society and the LGBT+ community still need to address, but that’s another blog! We were the vectors of disease, we would unpick the fabric of decency and moral society. We were ‘…swirling around in the cesspit of their own making’ according to ‘God’s Copper’, Manchester’s Chief Constable James Anderton. There was a horrific torrent of abuse and discrimination aimed at a vulnerable community. There was no effective treatment for HIV prior to 1996 when combination therapy arrived, and so HIV/AIDS was effectively a death sentence, the epidemic ‘…became a means of reinforcing existing prejudices and discrimination towards gay men as a whole’ (Jones, 2015). With no legal recognition of partnerships, bereaved people could find they were suddenly homeless as they were not on a mortgage or rent contract and might be excluded from their partner’s funeral by a homophobic family. Lesbians were equally at risk, with no protection from being fired for being LGBT+ and victims of discrimination and violence. The tabloid press revelled in hate speech, with headlines about the ‘Gay Plague’ (Braidwood, 2018).

    LGBT+ people in Manchester responded in huge numbers to this climate of hatred, starting in March 1988 ‘Not Going Shopping – Stop the Clause’ (Ward, 2019) with Liberation 1991 and other events characterised by protest and demands to see us as people with human rights first and foremost. This community action it could be argued, began to change public attitudes from an all-time low to the current acceptance of lesbian, gay and bisexual people. This recent history is all too easily forgotten in the party atmosphere of Manchester’s more recent pride events.

    It seems to me that, just as LGB people were used as a convenient scapegoat for society’s ills, or as a way of garnering political points, trans and non-binary people are being demonised in exactly the same way. Donald Trump, arguably the most powerful leader on earth has launched an attack on transgender people’s health care, employment and more, with the very existence of trans and non-binary people denied by government (Green, Benner & Pear, 2018).

    In the UK, toxic debate has seen women’s rights and trans rights set against one another. No one would argue that women’s rights are secured; almost fifty years since the Equal Pay Act (1970), women still face discrimination and casual misogyny, as well as significant gender pay gaps (Holder et al. 2018). However, trans and non-binary people face extreme levels of discrimination, abuse and casual transphobia. The trans community needs allies to challenge this and support trans and non-binary people’s wellbeing and mental health as they live their lives under often extreme stress. The process of initial transition is challenging enough, with long waiting times for gender identity clinics in excess of two years (Westcott, 2018).

    Stonewall reported that trans and non-binary people are likely to experience abuse, with one in eight physically attacked by a colleague or customer at work, a third discriminated against when visiting a café, bar or restaurant and a quarter of trans people in a relationship experiencing domestic abuse. (Bachmann & Gooch, 2017).

    With this extreme level of discrimination and violence, relentless press attention and political venom, I feel we have a moral responsibility to stand with our trans and non-binary siblings. After all, it has always been trans people of colour, those facing double discrimination, who have sparked profound change for the LGBT+ community. Icons such as Martha P. Johnson, present at the Stonewall riots, which gave the UK charity its name, rubbed shoulders with butch lesbians, male sex workers and homeless youth (Schlaffer, 2016). Martha was murdered in 1992, a crime ignored by the law enforcement agency (Lee, 2017). It is, of course true that cis-women are discriminated against, raped and murdered too. However, the risk to trans and non-binary people is extraordinarily high, and the sheer volume of crimes should shock us all. 

    Amidst the intellectual discussions of women’s rights versus trans rights, it is important to remember that this is notan intellectual discussion, it affects the everyday experiences of trans and non-binary people. Just as in the 1980s and 1990s LGB people were discussed as if they were a sexual oddity, ‘perverts’ dehumanised with no real right to a place in modern society, so trans and non-binary people are discussed today. This impacts on people’s self-respect, and therefore their mental health. Negative attitudes directly lead to an increase in discrimination, violence and murder; we must take responsibility for recognising this as a first step to changing society, just as we have done previously with LGB rights.

    I strongly believe that trans and non-binary people have no choice in their gender identity, in the same way I have no choice about my sexuality. To deny one’s true self is crippling, and often fatal. We must made gender diversity as socially acceptable as the diversity in sexuality if everyone is to live lives that reach their full potential. We also have a debt to trans and non-binary people for their key role is helping us as LGB people to achieve legal equality and acceptance by society.

    So, what have you done to support your trans and non-binary siblings lately?

    Sean Pert

    *”Stand By Your Trans”

    Following Kate O’Donnell’s inspiring performance and participation during Happy Valley Pride 2018, we embarked on a local poster campaign, across Hebden Bridge and our surrounding Calderdale towns, in support of Kate/Trans Creative’s stance to #StandByYourTrans


    Readers Wifes
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    Bourgois & Maurice

    August 20, 2018 Nicola Jones0

    So, when I arrived in Hebden Bridge back in 2003, if you mentioned ducks, it was in the context of the quaint tradition of the busiest day of the year, where a river of yellow plastic ducks are chucked into the river and encouraged to compete with the real ones, on a short journey down river, every Easter Bank Holiday. Let’s not knock it, it draws crowds annually. But this year, we re-defined Duckie in Hebden Bridge.

    The anticipation was palpable.  As soon as it was announced, tickets sold out in just 48 hours. The Trades already having a reputation for hosting some of the best nights this side of the Pennines, joining forces with a club night that has successfully ran for over two decades. It was the perfect combination of people, place and undoubtedly, occasion.

    Happy Valley Pride’s loyal contingent is a true mixed tribe. Often commented on is the fact that so many have ‘escaped’ the city to move here, renounced by many locals as ‘oftcummers’ – it’s always a balancing act.  Being part of the community, whilst nostalgically reflecting on a misspent youth in the UK’s cities.  And for the LGBT+ community in particular, that obviously comes with a doubtless, crumpled ticket to the clubs of the 90’s and 00’s.

    So, did it live it to expectations.  As they say in Yorkshire, “By gum”, it did.  Outfits were planned, yet discarded on arrival due to the first big downpour in weeks, coinciding with a crammed and sauna-like dance floor.  Monster Munch hanging from the ceiling and Readers Wifes playing long-forgotten tunes.  It was reminiscent of Narnia meets Nightmare on Elm Street.  Dark, sexy, tribal.

    Interspersed with brilliantly original cabaret performances from Bourgeois & Maurice (last year’s sell out), new friends, Barbara Brownskirt – (“Judy, Judy, Judy …. Dench” is STILL being repeated as a highlight), Victoria Sin – who knew sandwich-making could be an art form and finally the vision of Ursula Martinez streaking down Holme Street will live on as legendary.

    We didn’t want it to end, but of course it had to and it all felt like a dream. There’s talk of turning the tables, with rumours of a road trip – Happy Valley Pride Goes to Duckie.  We’re already clicking those red heels and channeling Dorothy ‘There’s no place like Duckie’.

    It was reminiscent of Narnia meets Nightmare on Elm Street.  Dark, sexy, tribal.


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    July 6, 2018 0

    Welcome to this first blog from the Happy Valley Pride Youth Engagement Committee!

    David Kennedy and Sean Pert look back at the last few weeks, getting local children and young people involved in the festival through art.

    David and I have been busy talking to local schools about Happy Valley Pride and this year’s theme of ‘Revolution!’

    Video

    We developed a presentation telling everyone about our theme and what the competition involves.
    Watch the video here: Video about Happy Valley Pride’s Art Competition 2018

    Riverside Junior School

    Our first stop on Monday 18th June was Riverside Junior School, Hebden Bridge. Mrs Taylor introduced us to the children and we talked about how to get over the message of LGBT+ people being part of the community and everyone living in harmony. Some comments from the children were “Art is a language” and “Revolution is a big change”. Several children were able to tell us about LGBT+ people they were related to, and knew, and they wanted us to know that Mrs Taylor was “Good at helping with Art”.
    We can’t wait to present the winners with their certificates on Thursday 19th July!

    Art is a language

    Todmorden High School

    Next stop was Todmorden High School on Wednesday 27th June. We were lucky enough to view some of the pupils’ work in the gallery before meeting one of the classes. Mr Freeman, Head of Art led a fascinating discussion of art and how this might be used to convey equality. Some of the young people were shocked to hear that LGBT+ people might still encounter prejudice and discrimination. A spray painting display of revolutionary themed flags is to be expected!

    Have you ever experienced discrimination because you’re gay?

    Central Street Infant and Nursery School

    It’s never too early to think about equality and that we are all different in some ways and the same in many others. At Central Street Infant and Nursery School our very own much loved volunteer Ms Tregellas is one of the school’s teachers and the children will be making colourful and attractive designs and pictures as part of the competition.

    The festival display

    The flags decorated by local children and young people will form part of the display at the Expo on Saturday 11th August 2018. The flags and banners can also be seen at the Picnic in the Park on Sunday 12th August 2018. See the programme for details.

    Join in the fun

    Are you a school in the Calder Valley keen to get your pupils’ artistic skills shine? We are keen to involve children and young people in Happy Valley Pride to show what a vibrant, welcoming and fun place the valley is to live. We run an annual art competition as part of the festival and our in-house artist David Kennedy is available to come along and talk about how art transformed homophobic graffiti into a work of art spreading love and acceptance.

    We have an Enhanced DBS and can help your school with thinking about preventing bullying and promoting the acceptance and understanding of diversity.

    Get in touch!


    We’ve come such a long way, but equality is still somewhere over the rainbow.

    Tim Whitehead

    July 3, 2018 Tim Whitehead0

     

    Gay couples hold hands too – join the revolution

    Our programme cover was well timed. Conceived before today’s headline news – reminding the world that holding hands in public is still not accepted for gay people.  This year’s theme – Revolution – is all about how attitudes towards the LGBT+ community have undergone a revolution of their own in the past five decades, but there is still work to be done.

    Our newly appointed patron, Peter Tatchell, was recently detained at the Kremlin, for protesting persecution against gay people in Russia and only last year Stonewall announced that hate crime against the LGBT+ community has risen 80% in the UK since 2013.

    Very recently I was sat outside a pub in Hebden Bridge with friends and some passers-by made casual homophobic comments. We’ve come such a long way, but equality is still somewhere over the rainbow.

    So, holding hands – the cover of this year’s programme brochure – represents something that is still a revolutionary act for many LGBT+ people — simply holding hands in public.

    I’d like to ask as many of you as possible, however you identify, to hold hands during Pride, whether it’s with your best friend, your partner, your child or your parent.

    Let’s hold hands and spread a revolution of love throughout Hebden Bridge and the surrounding areas.

    Be here, be you, be proud!

    Tim

    Full programme and tickets will be available weekend of 7/8 July